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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 50 (some duplicates have been removed)
to help elect pro-choice women across this country. i am so proud to be one of nine emily's list women reelected in 2012 to the u.s. senate's and one of 20 women sworn in earlier this month, the most ever in our nation's history. no one runs for senate alone. no one runs for senate alone and wins. i was never alone, not for a singesingle minute. you were with me every single step of the day. back in may 2011 when the senator announced that he was retiring, i convened a conference call to figure out whether there was a way i could step up and run. just like you have been with me for so long, emily's list was there for me at that moment. you were there day one when i ran for the house of representatives bac in 1998. the pungent scent i cannot win. you read there with me. -- you were there with me every step of the way. i became the first woman to represents a woman in the house o. and on the first day of this long journey you were there for me with sage advice, plenty of encouragement and a commitment to stand with me every single day. you follow it through and then some. thousands of yo
's list, held a banquet for some of the newly elected female representatives. house democratic leader nancy pelosi addressed the gathering and the new 113th congress has 20 women now serving in the u.s. senate. this is about 45 minutes. [applause] >> good morning, everyone in. thank you very much. [applause] thank you. this, being a sunday morning, i want to begin by saying that this is the data god has made, that us rejoice and be glad. let us rejoice and be glad that as we gather here in the white house, barack obama is being officially sworn in as the president of the united states. earlier this day, joe biden was sworn in as vice president of the united states. tomorrow, it will be a ceremonial, but today it is official. what a great day. what a great day that we are celebrating emily's list success in strength in numbers. women leading the way. isn't that exciting? 15 more women senators in the united states senate. that is remarkable. in this cycle, we have 80 more democratic women in the house bringing our number to 61 women in the house. [applause] you hear a lot about how peo
mile to assure the russians about future u.s. missile defense moves. >> after my election, i will be more flexible. >> it's going to be harder this time. i don't see where u.s./russian relations can productively go. that's going to be a big problem for the president, starting, of course, with syria. but ooh ran is the even bigger issue that is undecided. we have gotten some russian help, so far on iran. but it doesn't mean we will get russian help with the next step. >> the arab spring signaled the fall of middle-east leaders with whom u.s. officials had, for 30 years, cultivated careful relationships. president obama called on hosni mubarak to step down. >> a change must take place. >> allocated u.s. resources for a no-fly zone in libbia, leading to the killing of moammar khadafy. but while calling for bashir al-assad to step down, a war continues. >> overall, president obama's legacy toward the middle-east is one of limited american activism. that is carcaturd by how we handled egypt, libya, syria, iraq. >>. >> there are unanswered questions about the investigation into the
in politics, san antonio mayor julian castro and his air dentical twin, joaquin castro, just elected to congress. that's a big group but there's a lot to talk about on "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> and good morning again. we welcome to the broadcast david plouffe architect of the president's election in 2008, again last year a key adviser in the administration throughout. let me ask you first about the situation in algeria where this awful terrorist attack took place. we know that there were seven americans at that compound, and the reports are one is dead. do you have any more information on any of the others? >> i don't this morning bob. obviously, if and when we have additional information, the state department will release that >> and what about this whole state of terrorism now? have we defeated al qaeda, as some in the administration were talking about earlier? >> well, we have i think decimated a lot of al qaeda's top leadership particularly in the afghanistan-pakistan region. but i think wh
doesn't have to worry about being re-elected. he's got four years left and it's an opportunity for him to really go for it. >> well, i think we're going to see a president with a new level and a new kind of resolve as we did through the campaign. i think we're going to see some of the things we heard about already in terms of immigration reform and new moves around gun safety. i think we'll see some progress on the peacekeeping around the world, and we will see an emphasis on economic growth, which is absolutely key. >> now, he's obviously facing big, tough challenges certainly economically, and also with the republicans who still hold the house. it's a fine line, isn't it? he's already shown a sign since he got re-elected he's not going to take any nonsense from the republicans and he's being pretty tough on them. but that's not necessarily going to help him get stuff done. it may, if anything, make them more intransgent. how does he play that tricky line? >> well, you know, probably he's the better one to answer that question, but i think it's more and more apparent to the american p
and claim vindication in the election. >> does a speechwriter write a draft and the president marks it up, sends it back? does the president write the first draft or sketch out an outline and speechwriter fills in the blanks? >> it's different for each president and circumstance. the worst speeches are always the state of the union addresses because everybody sees them coming a year in advance. by four years into the administration with a president who is a known accomplished writer and somebody who is proud and pride full of his literary accomplishments i'm sure he's had ideas for this. >> and close to his own speechwriter who has been with him a long time, they have a good relationship. there will be that give and take. >> at the end of the day when the speech is over, you will consider it a success if? >> if people feel better about america. i hope first it's short and second makes them feel better about the country and times they live in. >> i think if he calls attention to real problems in honest ways, but then asserts there's hope beyond the divisions of our current politics. >> tha
rating gets a downgrade. >> now, where were we? >> we were here, 2012. election year. what could possibly go wrong? ♪ i'm so in love with you >> how big a deal that the president sings? is it true he has a good voice? ♪ so in love with you >> major developments. >> i think same-sex couples should be able to get married. >> supreme court holds obama care is constitutional. democrats hold convention, obama holds clinton. campaign push, presidential debate, presidential dud. >> now four years later, we still have trillion dollar deficits. >> presidential improvement. >> i don't look at my pension, it isn't as big as yours. it doesn't take as long. >> presidential victory. a time to look back at sports teams, disaster, promises kept, most troops out of iraq, sports teams, disaster. upheaval, khaddifi dead. sports teams, sports teams, promises broken. guantanamo still open. disaster, tragedy. ft. hood, tucson. >> our hearts are broken by their sudden passing. >> colorado, newtown. >> for those of us who remain, let us find the strength to carry on and make our country worthy of their memor
. and the most elite of the elite are the group who have been re-elected. >> mm-hmm. >> and so i think that this is their chance, this is obama's chance to really say put it out there and say this is -- the first time is really -- this is what i want to do, and the second time is, like, this is what i want to be. and i think that in a case of a black president it's even more important because the first time around it was jubilant, it was the first black president, it was so exciting. the second time around is this wasn't a fluke. this guy really did it. he did a good job, and the american people reaffirmed that he did a good job and re-elected him. and so many-in some way because he's a black president i think that the second inaugural for him is more important than the first. >> well, that is the reason for the second inaugural. let's go to nbc's peter alexander because peter was there for that d -- the more intimate inaugural, if you will, having been sworn in some 35 minutes ago, give us some details. >> reporter: alex, this ceremony lasted barely a minute, the president surrounded
, as well. this as you say was history. 16th president to win election to two consecutive terms and be sworn in. now, they have all the ceremonial swearings tomorrow. this more intimate friend in the blue room, family and close friends. amid all the constitutional moments there was also a light family moment where a dad got to talk to his daughter, take a listen. >> thank you sir. [ applause ] >> i did it. all right. thank you everybody. >> reporter: i did it, he said and sasha said you didn't mess up. vice president biden got to try this out first very early this morning. reason why it was so early is that just sotomayor had to get on to a train to go to new york city to sign her books. she was trying to get to barnes & noble this afternoon in new york city. >> gregg: you got to plug that book, that is more than the vice president of the united states. your publisher wants more book sales. [ laughter ] >> gregg: how might tomorrow's big speech by the president really set the tone and tenor for policy in his second term? >> reporter: very important. saw president bush try to do this in 2005
, democratic senator chuck schumer of new york and newly elected republican senator ted cruz of texas. welcome back as senator cruz to "meet the press." welcome to both of you. i want to start on the gun debate. because as i say, even before the second term is officially under way, this debate is well under way. here are the highlights of what the president wants to accomplish with comprehensive gun control. universal background checks. he'd like to pursue a ban on high capacity magazines. an assault weapons ban that, of course, lapsed in 2004, and he'd like stricter laws on gun trafficking. but senator schumer, just as i challenged wayne la pierre of the nra on this program very hard when this initially came up, i challenge you as well with the question of is this really going to make a difference? and rich lowry wrote something that caught my attention in "the national review." no one can write a law against mothers owning guns that one day might be turned against them by deranged sons who then commit horrific acts of murder-suicide. shooting rampages are hard to prevent because they are so
in 1964. and if there had been no candidate goldwater in 1964, there would have been no president-elect ronald reagan in 1980. it was goldwater, you see, who approved reagan's famous a time for choosing television address which made reagan a political star overnight and led to his running for governor of california and eventually president of these united states. david recounts how bill rusher shored up the goldwater committee when money ran short and spirits sagged. skillfully guided young americans for freedom if his early, chaotic days, enforced some order and discipline on the blythe spirits who ran national review, expanded a conservative movement through the tv program "the advocates," husband newspaper column and his -- his newspaper column and his lectures and championed ronald reagan when other conservatives were somewhat skeptical about the actor-turned--politician. bill rusher loved american politics, rare wines, traveling to distant lands and national review's effervescent editor, bill buckley. of whom he once said, quote: the most exasperating people in the world are so off
the video. we have 2014 coming up. we hope to elect many more women to the congress. if we did not have so many women in congress up till now, we would not have the first woman speaker of the house and. thank you to emily's list for that. listening to the shiloh baptist church choir and taking our lead from them, when i saw the video and heard them tell me that to 16, and our own hopes for two fourteen -- you ain't seen nothing yet. thank you, emily's list, for having women lead the way, for helping to change the playing field. a promise you this. but with emily's list is held, if we reduce the role of money and politics, overturn the citizens united and the rest, and increase the level of civility in politics, we will change the environment in which politics is conducted. we will elect many more women to public office. that is a very good thing for our country. thank you, emily's list. we are emily, and we ain't seen nothing yet. thank you all. [applause] >> a look at the jefferson memorial. president obama's public inauguration as tomorrow, which happens to be allocated. -- mlk day. [ind
to do which is represent the people of the united states. we have a democratically elected republic and people need to pull out their history books and find out what that is and realize that when we send them to office, would give them the authority to vote the way we feel and if we feel they are not representing our opinions and needs, we need to replace them. thank you very much. host: stephen dinan will be joining us at the bottom of the hour. later, author and historian richard norton smith will dig in the details of the second term and what this president could be facing. this headline is from "the washington examiner" -- the public information officer for the u.s. capitol police is joining us on the fund. guest: for having me. host: we look at the seams around washington, what can visitors expect tomorrow? guest: they should expect that we will do our best to protect people. give time to get through lines and things of that nature. host: this is a map we found this morning in "the washington post." the area in red it will be the high-security area. many of the roads around the
that when you're in the middle of an election campaign, whoever you are, you have less flexibility. so i think more was made -- >> it's a different kind of relationship with russia, which is after all a behemoth out there that we are not talking about very much and it is a big stakes in iran. >> i think we have to deal with russia. they are on a player on a number of issues that are important to us. and we have to feel out the relationship now with putin who is being very aggressive. >> we're almost out of time. we have five seconds here. >> i don't think that the united states of america can be effective if we stand with the forces of autocracy in front of freedom. that's fundamental. >> i have to make that the final word. thanks to all of you here. quick programming note, stay with nbc news for special coverage of president obama's inauguration starting tomorrow on "today." that's all for today. if it's sunday, it's "meet the press." >>> i barack hussein obama do solemnly swear -- >>> president obama takes the oath of office for the second time at the white house. good afternoon to you
that i believe will open the floodgates for special interests. i don't think that the american elections should be bankrolled by america's most powerful interests and worse by foreign entities, but they should be decided by the american people. >> that was the 2010 state of the union and slamming the justices as they sat there and got a lot of attention back then, but do you think that he first of all gets one or two supreme court justices and do you think that perhaps we see some sort of legislation that deals with rolling back citizens united? >> and the answer is yes and yes. and i think that given some of the near retirement or the retirement ages of some of the democratic judges are, that they may decide within this term to step down to ensure that obama gets a pick for their replacement, and not cut it too close, so that is i think a very big possibility that he will have at least one replacement, and there have been names floating around about who that could be, but on campaign finance reform, there is a lot of talk about other cases that might be brought or in the system. i think
corrupted by the athens. it is an f. us that aims for at political and social elected us in on the one hand, and moral anarchy on the other. you cannot win, but they can make us all losers. to meditate on the meaning of this great contest, we've assembled a distinguished panel of chambers intellectual and moral affairs. you berkowitz is the current senior fellow at the hoovery/ institution where he chairs theo hoover task force on national security and law, and co-chairsk the hoover task force on the virtues of a free society. in the past he served as an associate professor at george mason university school of law, and an assistant and associate professor at harvard university. he is the author of virtue and the making of modern liberalism. he holds a jd and a ph.d inñs political science from thisvç institution, an m.a. from hebrew university of jerusalem, and a ba in english literature from swarthmore college. norman podhoretz -- i feel silly introducing these people -- norman podhoretz served as editor-in-chief of "commentary" magazine from 1960-1995, and is their current editor at larg
that dr. king talked about 50 years ago been fulfilled, would to re-election of president obama? >> i think you cannot deny that we have made tremendous progress and the election of -- re- election of president obama is another milestone moment in civil rights history, but we still have a long way to go as far as racial reconciliation in america, building what dr. king called the beloved community. tomorrow, yes, it is a milestone moment, not only for the president, but for america's quest for racial reconciliation. >> we have two experts. john mcconnell worked with george bush on his inaugural address. terry edmonds spent eight years working with bill clinton. we talked about the reference to dr. king. your former boss making reference to abraham lincoln in his second inaugural address. >> we will get that ready in just a moment. let's go to the phones. curtis from akron, ohio. >> thank you for taking my call. it is a pleasure to be on the air. i had the privilege, when i was 20 years old, i was on the executive board of kent state democrats. me and some of the members of the executi
? >> i think it's a little inconsistent. president should be listening to people who won election during the last cycle. there were a lot of republicans that won pretty solid elections and now serving. i want to make sure the president is inclusive with the word we, and he has to try to find common ground with them rather than stand with home common ground. >> eric: how about dealing with the debt ceiling and mr. boehner he won't negotiate anymore? >> the president is going to have to reach across the aisle and demonstrate sincerely he will listen and work. he has to show up for negotiations. he was an absent president when it came to negotiating some of the solutions to the big problems during his first term. he has to be part of the solution and work with congress to try to get things done. we watched george w. bush do it when he did it in a controversial election, first term and second term. first term he reached across the aisle and got tax cuts for everyone even though the united states senate switched majority control from republicans to democrats in may of his first year in office
back, fdr broke the unwritten code of serving more than two terms. he was elected to four terms. in today's modern age, could we have more than two terms for any president? guest: great question. >> you worked for ronald reagan. if his health was better, of course, would he have run for a third term? guest: i doubt it. he talked about it after he left office. he was going to campaign for appeal of that amendment. he thought the american people should be able to vote for anyone wanted to vote for. it is very difficult to imagine after eight years of office -- we've used up our presidents. that is why this string of two- term presidents is really so unusual. we have a string of one-term presidencies before that. that became the norm. host: let me share with ronald reagan said in january of 1987. state of union address. there was the iran-contra sc andal. [video clip] >> i have one major regret. i took a risk with our action in regards to iran. it did not work. for that, i accept full responsibility. it was not wrong to try to save lives. certainly, it was not wrong to try to secur
won the election. thak a look at the poll numbers, a new cnn/"time" magazine/orc poll, shows the president's approval rating is 55%, 43% disapprove of the way he's doing his job. breakdown, 92% of democrats say they approve. 13% of republicans say the president is doing a good job. >> just 13% of republicans say the president is doing a good job. so how does he begin to bridge that gap? clark judge is with us right now. he's a speech writer who worked in the reagan white house, he's the founder and managing director of the white house writers group. so clark, you think the president needs to do something to reach across the aisle. to talk about the common themes that unite us. how do you do that? >> a good model for him would be bill clinton's inaugural address, or ronald reagan's second inaugural. both of those were similar kinds of political environments. congress was in the hands of the other party. or one house was, at least. and each of them was very gracious towards the other party. reached out, said things about the goodwill of the other party. >> the difference there
, with republicans here in washington, since his re-election, certainly the way he handled the fiscal cliff and i want to point to a clip of the president and his press conference earlier this week. take a look: >> president barack obama: they have suspicions about social security. they have suspicions about whether government should make sure that kids in poverty are getting enough to eat. >> chris: now we learn that the president is taking his campaign organization and transforming it into an issue advocacy group, organizing for action. is it fair to say that the president has given up on the inside game of negotiating here in washington and is much more interested in bringing outside pressure to bear on the people up on capitol hill. >> chris, you have to do both and i think that is a lesson from the first four years, you can't do one or the other. and i think we'll continue and, listen, the fiscal cliff deal you talked about, we have just about every republican senator who voted for this. we have cut taxes with the republicans and cut spending with the republicans and democrats, on evaluatbvi
of state is-- >> normally a republic -- formally a republic. >> five-year term elected. political parties many. i counted at least 15. gdp per capita, what do you think it is? >> probably a thousand dollars. >> $1,300. you're still with t. men and women dominantly female about four million. and airports with paved runways. how many? how many airports with paved runways in mali? >> three. >> eight. >> how many do we have with paved runways? do you know how many? >> hard to count them all. >> probably ten. >> the government has been overthrown by the military guy we trained. he grabbed power. >> secretary panetta said that the u.s. is not in a position to train the mali military because it's not a democracy. >> they defected to the al qaeda, all the guys we trained. >> are we doing this because of france or are we doing it because we know al qaeda is there? >> ultimately there's a threat to the u.s. down the road. but france is an ally and, yes, we're doing it because of france. >> primarily because of france? >> pry pearl-- >> -- pry pearl-- >> -- primarily-- >> what did lafayette do for t
elected the past four years and 30% say more bipartisan and 15% were unsure exactly why we were calling them. >> and by the way his approval rating was right where george w. bush's was starting hicks second turn and below bill clinton, and 51%. and he said i'm going to close gitmo, that did not work out his way and almost everybody said it would be impossible to close because we've got a problem, we have nowhere to put those people. >> he said he'd close it in the first year. >> the first thing he signed. >> absolutely. the left plank after he didn't do it the first year, he'll do it the second year and the third year and the fourth year. >> harder when he's a candidate to an achieve. the economy, they said if they passed the massive unemployment, it'd keep under 8%, it was spiked up to 10% and down to 7.8 and they say it's a fail. and killed osama bin laden, and passed health care, what kind of program we'll be we're only getting it now, it passed two years ago. >> alisyn: and iraq, promised to end iraq and making steps towards that as well. >> iraq and afghanistan. >> although unemplo
risks. the congressional clock is still going according to the next election. >> reporter: but he can't push too hard. former reagan chief of staff says after a second win, most presidents have an inflated view of their power. >> so you have to figure out ways you can accomplish things and go directionally in the way you're going. realizing that time is an enemy. get as much done as you can, but don't overreach. >> reporter: a lesson president obama promises he learned. >> i'm more than familiar with all the literature about presidential overreach in second terms. we are very cautious about that. >> reporter: at the same time, he has to battle white house fatigue. >> people get tired. staffers leave. and you lose some institutional memory. >> reporter: above all, avoid scandal. what is known as the second term curse. something quite a few modern day presidents have fallen victim to. >> i am not a crook. >> reporter: for richard nixon, it was watergate. he resigned over the break in and cover up just 18 months after his re-election. >> i did not have sexual relations with that woman. m
reminds me when i read that of the comment during the last election from then senator now president obama about people clinging to their guns. and bill clinton saying politically you need to be careful with this. >> bill clinton grew up in arkansas and knows this kind of stuff in his bones. he knows the danger that it can present to the democratic party. they have lost mid terms in the past because of the gun issue. al gore, clinton talked specifically about al gore taking an unpopular side of a gun issue in colorado, lost colorado and lost the presidency. also democrats are concerned about this issue for 2014. in the senate you have red state democrats up for reelection in alaska and arkansas and montana, in south dakota. and in laz. a bunch of red states and they are very worried about taking positions that will lose the seats. >> take a look at a couple of polls because the numbers are interesting. this one says in the debate on guns which is more important to protect they asked the people that were polled. 51% said the constitutional right to own a gun and 40% said citizens to be prot
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 50 (some duplicates have been removed)